Daily Archive: November 23, 2017

Nov
23

Mnangagwa the "Crocodile" to be sworn in as Zimbabwe's president

Mnangagwa the By MacDonald Dzirutwe HARARE (Reuters) – Emmerson Mnangagwa will cap a stunning political comeback when he is sworn in as Zimbabwe’s president on Friday, bringing the final curtain down on the 37-year rule of Robert Mugabe. Mugabe, 93, who had led Zimbabwe from independence in 1980, stepped down on Tuesday after the army seized power and the ruling ZANU-PF party turned against him. Just two weeks ago, she seemed to have the upper hand after Mugabe fired Mnangagwa on Nov. 6 as vice president for showing “traits of disloyalty”.


Nov
23

Texas Abortion Restrictions Struck Down As Unconstitutional

Texas Abortion Restrictions Struck Down As UnconstitutionalA federal judge has struck down Texas restrictions on a common second-trimester abortion procedure, ruling that the law blocks a woman’s constitutionally guaranteed right to an abortion.


Nov
23

Japanese politician barred from bringing baby to council session

Japanese politician barred from bringing baby to council sessionA local Japanese politician has stirred debate after she was forbidden from bringing her baby into a council session. In a case that contrasts starkly with the Australian lawmaker who breastfed her baby in parliament, Yuka Ogata was told she could not take part in the assembly on Wednesday if she had her seven-month-old son with her.  Officials of the Kumamoto municipal assembly said visitors and observers were forbidden from the floor, and that included the young children of politicians. The session eventually started 40 minutes late after Ms Ogata agreed to leave the infant with a friend.  It was the first time Ms Ogata had attended a plenary session since she gave birth to her son, the BBC reported. She said she wanted to show how difficult it was for women to continue careers and bring up children.   Ms. Yuka Ogata (Ogata is her family), one of a few female members of Kumamoto's City Council, has received… https://t.co/Q4KirSrif1— Kumamoto-i (@Kumamotoi) November 23, 2017 “I wanted the assembly to be a place where women who are raising children can also do a great job,” she told the Mainichi newspaper. The council said it would discuss ways to support lawmakers who had young children.  “We would like to work on a system where assembly members can participate in meetings with their children,” Speaker Yoshitomo Sawada, according to the Mainichi. Her move has sparked debate online with supporters saying she was brave and opponents questioning if it was a good idea to bring a baby to a workplace. “I think her act was wonderful. People wouldn't take problems seriously” if she hadn't shown up with the child, one Twitter user said. “Balancing work and child rearing isn't about being with a child all the time at a workplace,” said another user, who identified herself as a fellow working mother. “I really cannot understand her action,” wrote this user. Japan has consistently fared poorly in gender equality rankings in the developed world. Women are still often expected to give up work after having children, face chronic shortages of public childcare spots and regularly describe the existence of a “concrete” rather than glass ceiling preventing female workers from advancing to senior positions. So proud that my daughter Alia is the first baby to be breastfed in the federal Parliament! We need more #women & parents in Parli #auspolpic.twitter.com/w34nxWxG0y— Larissa Waters (@larissawaters) May 9, 2017 In contrast, Senator Larissa Waters returned to parliament in Australia in May after giving birth to her second daughter  and brought her baby Alia Joy with her while she voted.  Furthermore, she made political history in the country by breastfeeding her daughter in the chamber. In Britain, an independent review in July last year concluded that allowing women to breastfeed would be “symbolic” and showcase the Commons as a “role-model parent friendly institution”.


Nov
23

Vietnam prosecutes bank officials in corruption crackdown

Vietnam prosecutes bank officials in corruption crackdownVietnam has prosecuted five former officials of the unlisted Dong A Bank for violating rules that “lead to serious consequences”, police said on Friday, part of a widening investigation involving the Ho Chi Minh City-based lender. Energy and banking firms are at the heart of a sweeping crackdown on corruption in the communist state, a campaign that made global headlines this year when Germany accused Vietnam of kidnapping a Vietnamese businessman in Berlin. The troubled, partly private Dong A Bank is among several lenders under scrutiny of the authorities who say they want to tackle corruption, including abuse of power and violation of lending rules.


Nov
23

Mugabe's successor and the 'poisoned ice cream' plot

Mugabe's successor and the 'poisoned ice cream' plotOn August 17, the Zimbabwean government issued an official denial that Emmerson Mnangagwa, who was vice president at the time, had eaten ice cream at a political rally. “For the record, the Vice President did not eat ice cream,” Information Minister Chris Mushohwe said. “Yes, there was ice cream.


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