Daily Archive: November 26, 2017

Nov
26

Queensland result leaves Australian PM closer to edge

SYDNEY (Reuters) – The loss of a state election in Queensland has stepped up pressure on Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who risks losing control of parliament at a by-election next month.

Nov
26

Number of young people acting as ‘money mules’ doubles

Figures suggest there has been a doubling in cases of younger people laundering money.

Nov
26

Sabbath Railway Work in Israel May Unravel Netanyahu’s Coalition

A resurgence of Israel’s so-called Sabbath wars leads an ultra-Orthodox minister to quit on his rabbi’s orders, putting pressure on others in Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s cabinet.

Nov
26

The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial

Social protections can best be upheld through international cooperation. Labour should clearly back the single market and the customs union

British politics is polarised on nearly every axis, so it is strange how little conflict there is between Labour and the Conservatives on the biggest issue: the terms of departure from the EU. Jeremy Corbyn’s challenges to Theresa May over Brexit negotiations at prime minister’s questions last week felt remarkable because he so rarely opens battle on that front. Labour has not obstructed Tory legislation enabling the very hardest of Brexits. The frontbench say they would pursue a different model, putting “jobs first”. But whips have instructed Labour MPs to sit on their hands as the Tory agenda is enacted.

Mr Corbyn’s views in the area are vague, except to insist that for democracy’s sake, the referendum verdict must be honoured. That is a sensible starting point for the leader of a national party, especially one that represents many areas that voted leave. But ending EU membership leaves a spectrum of options, notably in the question of the single market and customs union. The Tories are dedicated to rupture from both; Labour equivocates.

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Nov
26

The rise of the robots brings threats and opportunities | Letters

Readers respond to the advance in robotics, and what it means for our economy, social fabric and the planet

The difference between the robots of today and all previous forms of automation is that they are so flexible (Editorial, 25 November). Intelligent robots will be utilised in any new enterprise rather than people now because the financial returns are likely to be so much greater, given that there will be no recruitment difficulties, wage demands, overtime claims, strikes, sickness absence, pensions, transport or housing problems to take care of. Factories can be situated anywhere, and HS2 could be redundant before it becomes operational.

In the past, workers displaced by automation could rely on new industries springing up to take them on, but in future these will create far more jobs for robots than people across the board. Our whole economic system, which concentrates on profitability and economics rather than the welfare of the population, can only encourage this trend. What we need is a new economic system.
Dr Richard Turner
Beverley, East Yorkshire

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